Sustainable Data Management

Data centers account network data like social network profiles and uploaded media. The U.S. alone stores a third of the world’s data—nearly 900 exabytes (900 billion gigabytes)—in data centers all over the country. With eight Internet users coming online every second, six of them in North America, data centers have to expand constantly to make room.

However, expansions take their toll on the local power grid. According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, data centers consumed a total of 91 billion kWh, enough to power New York’s homes twice over, in 2013. Most of the consumption stems from HVAC systems used to keep the databanks cool. After all, heat is the enemy of sensitive electronics. Continue reading

Current Transformers vs. Electrical Surges

You’ve probably often heard that you need to unplug your home appliances when not in use to protect them from electrical surges. This advice, if put into practice, can protect your investments. Electrical surges, after all, may not only damage your appliances but also cause fires. Here are some facts you need to know about this phenomenon to avoid its devastating effects. Continue reading

Integrating Current Sensors into Existing Systems

Different current sensors, when integrated into a measurement system, produce different outputs. As such, extreme caution must be taken when doing so, because installing the wrong sensor to your equipment or attaching a sensor the wrong way can lead to irreparable damage, not only to the sensor, but to the whole system as well. Likewise, using the incorrect sensor presents a huge safety risk to personnel. Continue reading

Considerations when Purchasing Current Sensors

In days past, most current sensing designs followed only a few basic approaches. With the advancements in technology came a slew of measuring choices, making the selection process a bit more challenging. Should you choose Reflective light proximity sensors? Hall Effect sensors? How about one that uses Eddy current sensing?

Granted, for general applications, any type would likely yield satisfactory results. However, if you’re asking more from your devices, or if you have to work in extreme conditions, some options work better than others. That’s when you need to be concerned about the choices you make. Continue reading

Use of Current Transducers in Conveyor Systems

In a production line that employs conveyors, expensive mechanical damage is often the result of the conveyor jamming but with the drive motor continuing to run. By installing a current transducer to detect an overload, the drive motor can be prevented from sustaining damages that can grind your system—and ultimately your production—to a complete halt. Continue reading

Look, Ma, No Magnets

Whereas core-type current transformers have magnetic cores, flexible ones like Rogowski coils don’t have any. A Rogowski coil’s shell only houses a helical coil wire whose ends are located at the attachable terminals. If a Rogowski coil had a magnet inside, it would lose its flexibility due to the solid slab of magnetic material.

Instead, it relies on the electromagnetic field the conductor itself generates, which simply refers to the metal conduit. Flexible transformers rely on Ampere’s law to pick up the electromagnetic field looping around the wire. According to the law, current movement along this imaginary loop is the same as current movement along the conduit. Continue reading

“Current” Affairs

Current transformers are rated at both primary and secondary windings. In a standard setup, the primary winding consists of the conductor passing through the transformer, while the secondary winding has the coil around the core hooked to a metering device like an ammeter. Consequently, a transformer with a 100/5 spec means the primary current is at 100 A, while the secondary current is at 5 A.

The use of the term “windings” is universal for both current transformers and transformers in general. However, current transformers are more concerned with measurement than stepping voltages up or down (although they have this capability, to some extent). The primary current is current from a power source, while the secondary current delivers the power to the load (i.e. ammeter). Continue reading